Suspect claims police used excessive brutality

Posted: 01/05/13 at 9:50 pm EST      Last Updated: 01/05/13 at 10:52 pm EST

SEATTLE (WHDH) -- The Seattle Police Department is facing a complaint of excessive force after a teenager being cuffed said police crossed the line.

But officers involved in the arrest tell a very different story.

It all started with an empty vehicle running next to a department store.

Suspect, Isaac Ocak came out to claim the car, but officers said they were concerned because he does not own it.

“Put yourselves in the officer's shoes. Out doing police work. Suspicious car. They make a stop,” said Sgt. Sean Whitcomb, Seattle Police Department.

Police said they tried to place him under arrest, but he resisted and even bit an officer. That's when things got ugly.

Ocak's attorney said nothing his client did warranted this level of violence, but Seattle police disagreed.

“The initial stop was constitutional and that the force that was used during the course of the arrest was reasonable and necessary to take the person into custody,” said Sgt. Whitcomb.

“What was excessive is all of it. There’s absolutely no need for force at all,’ said attorney, James Egan.

The 18-year-old's attorney filed a complaint, spotlighting the lead officer in the arrest, Larry Langley.

“This officer is a bully with a badge and I think it's really unfortunate. It's a waste of taxpayer money,” said Egan.

Professor William Bailey of the University of Washington who teaches pretrial procedure sees both sides of the story.

“If they have enough probable cause to take him into custody then just do it. There was a toying back and forth that did not seem professional,” said Bailey.

But Professor Bailey also said Ocak should have been more cooperative.

“When you are placed under arrest you have to cooperate,” said Bailey.

An investigation is now underway. The suspect was charged with felony assault on a police officer. But the charge was dropped.

Have a story idea or news tip for 7NEWS?

Email: newstips@cw56.com, or call us at 1-800-280-TIPS.